Catholic Voices

Imagining the infant Christ

I couldn’t sleep. It was a cold and cozy December night. Maybe I ate too many cookies. Or had a list that wouldn’t stop unrolling itself in my head. All I know is I was awake. I left my husband snoring deeply in our bed, curled up on the living room couch with the remote and searched for something to watch on television.

Let us adore on our knees the Bread that came down from heaven

In the son of the Virgin, “wrapped in swaddling clothes and lying in a manger” (Luke 2:12), we acknowledge and adore the “bread that came down from heaven” (John 6:41, 51). When the Messiah comes to earth to give life to the world, he is born in Bethlehem, which means “house of bread” in Hebrew. He sleeps in a manger used to feed cattle. His mission is evident: to feed us. He will later say, “I am the bread of life” (John 6:35, 48).

From the Editor - December 2020

Merry Christmas? In this season of COVID, maybe not. Too many have lost their lives or livelihoods. Perhaps we’re isolated from friends and family, missing the usual festivities.

Allow yourself to be amazed by the Eucharist

“The Church draws her life from the Eucharist. This truth does not simply express a daily experience of faith, but recapitulates the heart of the mystery of the Church, who joyfully experiences the constant fulfilment of the promise: ‘Lo, I am with you always, to the close of the age’ (Matthew 28:20).”

Jesus is the answer

In Catholic elementary school, I often heard a joke: “If you don’t know the answer on a test, just write ‘Jesus,’ because Jesus is always the answer.” At 22, that joke seems truer and truer. Jesus really is the answer to every question, but not quite in the way my classmates meant.

Memento mori: Confronting death to live well

I’m the kind of mom that makes my family visit cemeteries on vacation. We’ve read poems of famous poets at their graves. We’ve said prayers at the Tomb of the Unknown Solider. We’ve taken pictures at Alexander and Eliza Hamilton’s graves and traced our fingers over dates on tombstones in little out-of-the-way towns. And yes, we’ve sat with graves of those we’ve been intimately connected to, as friends or family.